Not that he had to drop off

Not every one of us is a good
human being.  It doesn’t matter where you’re
born at.  Some are just suffering on the inside.
Everyone copes with struggles in different ways, unfortunately,  others don’t cope with it well.  Instead they take out their anger or hate on
others.  Maybe they don’t have anger or
hate.  Instead they like to be in control
and like others being weak or vulnerable; 
“Mental instability, troubled childhoods, rejected love—there are multiple theories
that seek to explain why a person is compelled to kill again and again.” (Casale).
 Listed are the worst serial killers of
the 21st Century in Colombia. Daniel Camargo Barbosa,  Pedro Lopez, 
and finally,  the worst one of
them all being Luis Garavito.

Daniel
Camargo,  who “earned the name of “The Sadist of El Charquito”  for the brutal treatment of his victims,
hacking them to pieces with a machete.” (Locker).  Which was only one of many aliases. Camargo
had a confirmed number of 72 murders (speculated to be 150). His stepmother was
sadist and enjoyed dressing him up in girl clothes and his father who was not
very involved in his life (Murderpedia, Keller).  Through-out his life he was in and out of
jails and prisons.  According to “Murderpedia”
his first arrest was due to petty theft. He had a specific way of getting his victims.
He would stop a girl or a woman and ask for directions to a church claiming he
wasn’t from around town and that he had to drop off some money to a nearby church
in town (Casale; Seibold).  Using this
same method, while using his girlfriend, Esperanza as an accomplice, he would
drug and rape girls (Murderpedia, Keller). 
One of the girls went to officials and reported him. Where he was then
arrested for the rape and sentenced eight years. Once released in 1973, he
regretted letting his victims live and swore that he would not make that
mistake again (Keller).  He was
apprehended in Colombia after the assumption of raping and murdering a
nine-year-old girl. He was sentenced to 25 years
in a jail on an island. After a while of being jailed he escaped the Colombian
jail.  His great escape led to a journey
of swimming his way through shark infested water (Locker).  Officials thought he was eaten by sharks and
released this information to the media (Murderpedia, Keller).  While escaping in 1984, he made his way to
Ecuador where his next murders and rapes would continue. Apprehended once more
in 1988, while in Ecuador. Interrogated for a murder of a nine-year old girl. He
confessed to 71 murders while in Ecuador. Sentenced 16 years, which is the
maximum sentence in Ecuador. Where death penalties are non-existent. In 1994,
he was slain by a fellow inmate,  Luis
Masache Narvaez,  who was a cousin to one
of Camargo’s victims (Keller).

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     Next on the list is Pedro Lopez, also
referred to as “The Monster of the Andes” it’s confirmed he’s murdered 110 women
(although its suspected to be 300) between his native country of Columbia, Peru
and Ecuador (Casale). Serena states that Pedro was kicked out of his home when
he was eight years old from his parents after they found out that Pedro was
molesting his younger sister.  Once
fostered, he was molested and raped his by foster parents, teachers and cell
mates once in jail. Usually killing other inmates, claiming they had assaulted
him (Serena).  After having been taken
advantage of he then started to take advantage of other girls and women. “According to the Sword and Scale podcast,
López was almost put to death by tribal leaders in Peru in 1978, but a
missionary saved his life…)(Locker). 
According to Serena,  “members of
the Ayachucos community caught him attempting to abduct a nine-year-old girl.
Tribal law mandates that anyone caught for such a crime would receive the
punishment of being buried alive.”  The
missionary that saved his life, 
convinced the tribe to hand him over to Peruvian official instead.  In which where Serena also says,  “The Peruvian authorities, however, deported
him back to his native Colombia, without prosecuting him for any crimes. Once
back in Colombia, Lopez continued his murderous streak, again straying back and
forth to Ecuador.”  “Lopez’s activity
average out to three victims per week. He was apprehended and released several times
by local police, and he killed in between each arrest. He was blasé in
interviews, and unrepentant. Somehow, he keeps getting out of prison.”
(Seibold).  Caught in 1980, he confessed
to officials to the first 110 murders. Police didn’t really believe him, so he
helped them find the bodies of his victims. Although confessing to even more
murders, he was only charged with the 110 due to insufficient proof. Sentenced
16 years in Ecuadorian prison. Which according to Serena, is the maximum
sentence allowed by Ecuadorian law. He was released in 1994 after serving 14
years on good behavior. One hour after being released he was deported to
Colombia.  Once in Colombia, convicted of
a 20-year-old murder, he had to serve another four years in a mental
institution there. Declared sane in 1998. “In 2002, an arrest warrant was
issued by the Colombian police, in a murder case that resembled Lopez’s MO.” (Serena).  His whereabouts are currently unknown.

     Finally, Luis Garavito whose alias was “La Bestia” (The
Beast).  It’s no question of how
disturbed this man really was. Serena states, “According
to police reports, the Beast truly earned his nickname. The bodies of the
victims that were recovered showed signs of prolonged torture, including bite
marks and anal penetration. In multiple cases, the victim’s genitals were
removed and placed in his mouth. Several of the bodies were decapitated”.  He grew up being the eldest of seven children.
Often being sexually abused sexually, physically, and emotionally by his father
(Jenkins, Keller).  Homelessness
was a major problem for Colombia, children being the less housed (Seibold,
Serena). Recognizing the fact that most children were homeless and knew nobody
would go looking for them if they vanished (Serena).  Locker states
that from 1994 to 1999 is when all his crimes were committed.  He would rape, torture, murder, and
eventually dismembering them, young boys ranging from six to 16 years old. To
lure the children, he used candy and money. 
Garavito has a confirmed number of 138 murders (with a suspected number
of 400). An investigation was started in 1997
when officials found a burial ground (Serena).  According to Seibold, Garavito would draw out
maps of where he had dug the bodies. Once detained and question he confessed to
the murders back in 1999. “The sentences for these 138 cases add up to 1,853
years and 9 days. Because of Colombian law restrictions, however, he cannot be
imprisoned for more than 30 years. In addition, because he helped the
authorities in finding the bodies, his sentence has been decreased to 22
years.”  (Murderpedia).  Serena states that he now being held in a maximum-security
prison in an unknown location somewhere in Colombia, Garavito, who lives apart
from other inmates; is now described to be relaxed,  positive, 
and respectful by the guards in the facility. Which was not the case
before.

     In the case with these three serial killers who two had similar
MO’s but all three all had something in common. They preyed on the weak and
even the young. Even though the three of them had different reasons for which
they committed these heinous crimes, they usually had a troubled past. I think most
of us would think like how is it that someone could do such horrific things? Someone
of us even had our own battles in the past yet, we never turned to the “other” side.
Truth is, we could only endure for so long eventually some of us might just snap.
 It’s not about wearing a mask but simply
just not showing signs of it. I’ve never personally have ever been a fan of watching
documentaries or shows about serial killers or that whole “other” world.  I feel like the more you read or see into the more
susceptible you are to fall into it in the future.