My services) recommends you to eat at least

My Food Project 

Lily Dikkes
10 January
De nieuwe internationale school esprit 
Assigned by: Mr. Veenstra   Introduction ………………………………………………………… 3 
5 important food groups………………………………………… 4
Fruit and vegetables …………………………………………………………………… 4/5
Potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and other starchy food …………………… 5
Oil and spreads ……………………………………………………………………………… 6
Dairy and alternatives …………………………………………………………………… 6
Beans, pulses, fish, eggs, meat and other proteins ………………………6
The Netherlands compared to England……………………………………………6
Function of water……………………………………………………7
Cell life……………………………………………………………………………………………… 7
Body temperature regulation ……………………………………………………….… 7
Chemical and metabolic reactions ……………………………………………….… 7
Transport of nutrients and removal waists ………………………………….… 7
Energy needed per day ……………………………………………8
Woman……………………………………………………………………………………………….8
Men…………………………………………………………………………………………………….8
Child……………………………………………………………………………………………………8
Body Mass Index …………………………………………………… 9
Calculate your own BMI (for adults) ………………………………………………………… 9
Example ………………………………………………………………………………………………………9
Food diary …………………………………………………………… 10
3-day dietary advise ………………………………………………11
Day 1 …………………………………………………………………………………………………………11
Day 2 …………………………………………………………………………………………………………11
Day 3………………………………………………………………………………………………………….12
Conclusion………………………………………………………………………………………………….12
Final Conclusion…………………………………………………….13
Sources……………………………………………………………14/15

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

Introduction 

Have you ever wondered what food actually is and why we need it? In this essay I inform about what kinds of foods we need, the energy we need, why water is important and a what a BMI is and how to calculate it. I also introduce you to a way of eating healthier in my dietary plan. 

5 important food groups

What is a food group?
A food group is a collection of different kinds of foods with similar nutritional properties. Foods are divided into different food groups because there is a certain amount of daily servings you need for each food group to remain a healthy diet. Since every food group is based on the same kinds of nutritional properties, it is easier (for governments) to recommend daily servings of each food group.  

Fruit and vegetables 
The NHS (national health services) recommends you to eat at least 5 portions of fruit and vegetables a  day. Either fresh, frozen, tinned or dried. You can also have juiced fruit and vegetables but only a maximum of 150ml a day. That will also count as one of your 5 portions. Fruit and vegetables are full of vitamins, minerals and fibre. 
Vitamins and minerals: vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients, they support and strengthen bones and your immune system. They also help heal wounds and a really important factor is that they convert food into energy. 
Fibre: fibre is an important part of a healthy balanced diet. It helps digest and can prevent heart disease, diabetes, weight gain and also some types of cancer. 

Potatoes, bread, rice, pasta and other starchy foods 
The NHS says at least one third of the food we eat should be made out of starchy foods. Starchy foods are a good source of energy (carbohydrates) and are full of nutrients we need. They don’t only contain starch; also fibre, calcium, iron and B vitamins. Another important fact is that when you cook some foods for a long time at high temperatures, particularly starchy foods, a chemical is created called Acrylamide. Acrylamide is a chemical that can cause cancer. A few tips to reduce the chance of Acrylamide at home is to follow the cooking instructions on the pack, aim for a golden yellow colour while cooking, and a lighter yellow when baking, don’t keep raw potatoes in the fridge and make sure you eat a varied and balanced diet; getting your 5 A Day. 
Calcium: Calcium is the most common found mineral in our body. Most of the calcium in our body, is stored in the bones and teeth. (For kids, teens and adults, calcium is important for strong bones and teeth)
Iron: Iron is an essential mineral, it helps transport oxygen throughout the body. If you lack iron, your body can’t properly build oxygen-carrying red blood cells. Without healthy red blood cells, your body can’t get enough oxygen which can lead to becoming fatigued. 
B vitamins: All eight B vitamins help convert foods into energy; allowing us to stay energised throughout the day. 

Oil and spreads
The current U.K. guidelines advise you to cut down on all fats and replacing saturated fat with unsaturated fat. Although too much fat isn’t good for you, it is still an essential part of remaining a healthy and balanced diet. Fat helps the body absorb vitamins A, D and E. These vitamins are fat-soluble, which means they can only be absorbed with the help of fats. 
  

 

 
Dairy and alternatives 
Dairy and alternatives are an important part of a healthy diet. They are good sources of proteins and calcium. Your body needs those to be able to repair itself. 
Proteins: Every function of your cells, organs and whole body is controlled by proteins. They are important for various things: your body uses proteins to build and repair tissue, it helps make enzymes, hormones and other body chemicals and it builds up your bones, muscles, skin and blood. 

Beans, pulses, fish, eggs, meat and other proteins
These foods are a good source of protein, vitamins and minerals. Beans and pulses are cheap, low-fat and a great source of protein.  

The Netherlands compared to England 
A few differences I noticed between the Netherlands and England are: England (The NHS) focuses more on the intake of fruit and vegetables and stimulates the portions of meat and fish needed each day while the Netherlands (het voedingscentrum) tells you to eat more plant-based foods instead of meat and fish. They also stimulate you to eat a lot of fruits and vegetables but mainly want you to eat meals based on whole grain. 

Function of water 

Water is essential for various things, it is necessary for the life of a cell, being able to keep a stable temperature, intervening metabolic reactions, transporting elements and removing waste. The National Health Services, UK, advise you to drink between 6-8 cups of water a day. 

Cell life
Water is necessary for the life of a cell. It delivers the different nutritional elements it needs, e.g. minerals, trace elements (iodine, selenium, zinc) and vitamins. Water also helps process glucose which is the main fuel of the brain. 

Body temperature regulation 
Sweating is our main mechanism for thermoregulation. It prevents us from overheating when the temperature in a room or outside is very high. Sweating keeps your body cool while needed and helps maintain a stable temperature. 

Chemical & metabolic reactions
Water doesn’t only transport elements, it also makes sure metabolic reactions can intervene well. For example, water enables different kinds of reactions with different sorts of nutrients. Like proteins; they require water molecules. The water molecules are consumed in metabolic reactions. 

Transport of nutrients and removal of wastes
Water transports nutritional elements to cells and helps removing waste. The chemicals in your body that are bad for you (ammonium irons, creatinine) are illuminated via urine. Before that, the kidneys thoroughly eliminate, filtrate, and re-absorb water. 
 

Energy needed per day

Energy is essential for many things, it keeps us alive and allows our organs to work properly. If we consume to much calories, our body stores it as body fat. In the long run, this can lead to weight gain. If you consume too little, it can lead to tiredness, organ failure and a shortage of energy. That’s why it’s important to make sure you don’t eat too much calories, but also not too little. 

 Men
According to the NHS the average male adult needs approximately 2,500 calories per day, to be able to keep his weight constant and remain a healthy lifestyle.

Woman
The NHS recommends a woman to consume at least 2,000 calories a day, to maintain a healthy weight and lifestyle. 

Children 
These are the estimated amount of calories a child needs per day 

Years of age

Boys

Girls

7

1649kcal

1530kcal

8

1745kcal

1625kcal

9

1840kcal

1721kcal

10

2032kcal

1936kcal

*of course the amount of calories needed is different for everyone, depending on a lot of things, for example the amount of exercise someone gets. 

Body Mass Index

The body mass index (BMI) is a way of calculating, by looking at your height and weight, if your weight is healthy. For most adults, an ideal BMI is between 18.5 and 24.9. A BMI is calculated by dividing the kilograms of someone’s weight by their height in metres squared. For example, a BMI of 20 would be 20kg/m2. 

Calculate your own BMI (for adults)

 

Example: 
If you weigh 60kg and you’re 1.65 tall, divide 60 by 1,65 = 36,4
Then divide 36,4 by 1,65 = 22,0
BMI = 22,0kg/m2

Calculating a children’s BMI also takes its age and gender, as well as height and weight into consideration. Also, a BMI isn’t always correct about someone’s status of weight (underweight, normal weight, overweight etc). Since muscle is heavier than fat, a muscular person can have a healthy weight, even though its BMI is classed as obese. 

Food diary 

Week of 4-10th of December 2017

Breakfast

Lunch & snacks 

Dinner 

Calories in total

Monday

Granola with soya milk  

Whole meal sandwich with hummus, mandarin 

Broccoli, courgette, gluten-free pasta, beetroot 

850,6 kcal

Tuesday

Apple, banana, mandarin 

Whole meal sandwich with hummus, mandarin, walnuts 

Courgette, vat-free hamburger, brown rice, tomato 

844,8 kcal

Wednesday 

Banana, mandarin 

Mandarin

Olives, tortellini 

433,4 kcal 

Thursday 

Apple, banana, chia seeds, mandarin 

Rucola, hummus, mandarin

Lettuce, broccoli, brown rice

474,6 kcal

Friday

Granola with soya milk

Beetroot wrap, hummus, rucola 

Caesar salad (no dressing) 

493,9 kcal

Saturday

Granola with soya milk

Beetroot wrap, hummus, rucola

Yorkshire pudding, roast potatoes, minced pies

862,4 kcal

Sunday

Granola with soya milk

Cauliflower wrap, hummus, rucola

Broccoli, sprouts, spaghetti, tomatoes 

447,9 kcal

After seeing my calorie intake and being half done with this project, I realise how much vitamins, minerals and other nutrients needed, I lack. I almost every day eat the same thing without thinking about varying my food. All I care about is it being healthy. I will definitely, from now on, try to eat more varied, take the five a day foods into consideration and take alternatives for bread and starchy foods instead of just ignoring them. Especially after seeing what of the 5-a day foods I consumed every day.  
 
3-day dietary advise 

This dietary advise is based on a 14 year old girl who needs 2342 kcal per day. The NHS says that the key to a healthy balanced diet is to eat a variety of at least 5 portions of fruit and vegetables a day. Since I don’t eat dairy, sweets and bread I will base the 3-day dietary advise on alternatives. 

Day 1: 

Breakfast: Start the day with 2 portions of a dairy alternative and nuts. 
Grab a bowl, add soya yoghurt and a handful of nuts. Drink a cup of tea 
Snack: 2 mandarins 
Lunch: beetroot wrap (as alternative to bread) with hummus (counts as 1 portion of pulses) and rucola(1 portion of vegetables). 
Snack: 3 knäckebröd with nut paste 
Dinner: Bulgur with puréed tomato as sauce, courgette, broccoli and cumin for flavour. 

Make sure you drink water in between during the day. 

Day 2:

Breakfast Start the day with granola and some fruit (2 portions on nuts and 1 portion of fruit)
Snack: A banana and an apple (2 portions of fruit)
Lunch: carrot wrap with smoked salmon and spinach (2 portions of vegetables and 1 portion of fish)
Snack: nut mix (1 portion) 
Dinner: Quinoa with potatoes and black eyed peas. 

Make sure you drink water in between during the day.

Day 3: 

Breakfast: Soya yoghurt with chia seeds, 1 banana and an apple. (2 portions of dairy and seeds and 2 portions of fruit). 
Snack: cashew nuts (1 portion)
Lunch: chicken skewers (good source of protein. 1 portion of meat) with a homemade guacamole. (1 portion of vegetables and fruit)
Snack: pasta chips (one portion of pasta)
Dinner: Couscous with chick peas, grilled aubergine and courgette. 

Make sure you drink water in between during the day.

Conclusion:
I successfully tried to include every portion of the different 5-a day’s you need and tried to vary as much as possible. I am really happy with the result of the 3-day dietary advice. It is based on my diet preferences and could fit into my daily routine. I will definitely take trying this out into consideration. 

You can also make your own food diary based on these requirements:
a variety of fruit and vegetables a day. 5 portions 

4-5 wholemeal sandwiches 

meals based on potatoes, rice, beans and pasta. 4-5 servings 

1 portion of fish, meat or pulses

3-4 portions of dairy and alternatives. Such as almond milk, nuts and seeds. 

6-8 cups of water. Thee also counts. 

Final Conclusion

This project helped me realise how important food actually is and why we need it. I also learned how to vary between different foods and how to choose the right alternatives. This is a life lesson. I really enjoyed making this school project and learned a lot from it. 

Sources:

Body mass index chart Photograph . (n.d.). Retrieved from https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/aforathlete/images/a/a7/Standard-BMI-chart.png/revision/latest?cb=20150704143247

Calcium. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://kidshealth.org/en/teens/calcium.html

Daily mirror. (2014). Fruit and vegetables Photograph. Retrieved from https://goo.gl/images/8BTLM6

Dairy and alternatives Photograph. (2016). Retrieved from https://www.ingredientsnetwork.com/47/pdcnewsitem/04/24/89/dairy.jpg

Fat: the facts – Live Well – NHS Choices. (2017, May 1). Retrieved May 1, 2020, from https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/fat.aspx

Food group. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_group

Gov.uk. (2016, March 16). The Eatwell Guide (interactive) – NHS Choices. Retrieved March 16, 2018, from https://www.nhs.uk/livewell/goodfood/pages/the-eatwell-guide.aspx 

Harvard Health Publications. (2018, January 1). Vitamins & Minerals: Are You Getting What You Need? Retrieved from https://www.helpguide.org/harvard/vitamins-and-minerals.htm 

Hodmedod’s. (2016). British roasted flava beans. Retrieved from https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0719/9925/products/Roasted-Selection-2400×1600.jpeg?v=1481033038

https://goo.gl/images/3pjMJW Photograph. (n.d.). 

https://goo.gl/images/mVon34Photograph. (n.d.). 

Main functions of water in the human body. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.nestle-waters.com/healthy-hydration/water-fonctions-in-human-body

Matthews, R. (2016). Healthy fats Photograph . Retrieved from http://news.aces.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2016/08/healthy-fats-by-Tina-Larsson-on-Shutterstock-995×498.jpg

McDermott, N. (2017, August 16). The Benefits of Vitamin B Complex. Retrieved from http://dailyburn.com/life/health/benefits-vitamin-b-complex/

Milk and dairy foods – Live Well – NHS Choices. (2015, March 10). Retrieved November 30, 2017, from https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/milk-dairy-foods.aspx

Nestle water. (n.d.). Body temperature regulation. Retrieved from http://www.nestle-waters.com/healthy-hydration/water-fonctions-in-human-body/body-temperature-regulation

Nestle waters. (n.d.). Cell life. Retrieved from http://www.nestle-waters.com/healthy-hydration/water-fonctions-in-human-body/cell-life

Nestle waters. (n.d.). Chemical and metabolic reactions. Retrieved from http://www.nestle-waters.com/healthy-hydration/water-fonctions-in-human-body/chemical-and-metabolic-reactions

Nestle waters. (n.d.). Transport of nutrients. Retrieved from http://www.nestle-waters.com/healthy-hydration/water-fonctions-in-human-body/transport-of-nutrients

NHS. (2017). Fuel for life leaflet. Retrieved from https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/5ADAY/Documents/Downloads/Fuel_for_Living_Recipe_Booklet%5B1%5D.pdf

NHS. (2015, June 16). How many calories does a child of 7-10 need? – Health questions – NHS Choices. Retrieved April 30, 2018, from https://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/how-many-calories-do-children-need.aspx

NHS. (2016, July 12). What is the body mass index (BMI)? – Health questions – NHS Choices. Retrieved July 12, 2019, from https://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/3215.aspx?CategoryID=52=143

Nordqvist, C. (2016, January 11). How Many Calories Should I Eat a Day? Retrieved from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/245588.php

Pulses: lentils, peas and beans – Live Well – NHS Choices. (2015, May 15). Retrieved February 28, 2018, from https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/pulses.aspx

Starchy foods (carbs) – Live Well – NHS Choices. (2017, March 31). Retrieved March 31, 2020, from https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/starchy-foods.aspx

The Importance of Protein in Your Diet – Detour. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.detourbar.com/education/the-importance-of-protein-in-your-diet/

Triggle, N. (2017). Unhealthy fats Photograph. Retrieved from https://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/660/cpsprodpb/5FFC/production/_97427542_thinkstockphotos-180258510.jpg

Watson, S. (n.d.). Iron: What You Need to Know. Retrieved from https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-and-supplements/features/iron-supplements#1

Why do we need protein. Why do we need to eat protein? Amino acids. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.eatbalanced.com/why-eat-balanced/why-do-we-need-protein/

Why is fibre important? – Health questions. (2015, March 5). Retrieved February 28, 2018, from https://www.nhs.uk/chq/pages/1141.aspx?categoryid=51

Worth, T. (2010, December 2). Why Calcium Is Good for Your Body. Retrieved from http://www.health.com/health/article/0,,20412172,00.html

 

 

x

Hi!
I'm Isaac!

Would you like to get a custom essay? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out